Items filtered by date: July 2019

Clinical Effectiveness of Direct Oral Anticoagulants vs Warfarin in Older Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Ischemic Stroke: Findings From the Patient-Centered Research Into Outcomes Stroke Patients Prefer and Effectiveness Research (PROSPER) Study

JAMA Neurology

Data from 11,662 patients discharged after stroke shows those on DOACs (v warfarin) had fewer deaths (HR 0.88, P<0.001), all-cause readmissions (0.93; P=0.003), CV readmissions (0.92, P=0.02), haemorrhagic strokes (0.69, P=0.02), and hospitalisation with bleeding (0.89, P=0.009).

 

Long term risk of symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism after discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment for first unprovoked venous thromboembolism event: systematic review and meta-analysis

British Medical Journal

Review (18 studies;n=7515) found in patients with 1st episode unprovoked VTE who completed ≥3 months anticoagulation, risk of recurrent VTE was 10% in 1st year after treatment, 16% at 2 years, 25% at 5 years, and 36% at 10 years, with 4% of recurrent VTE events resulting in death.

 

 

The above records have been identified by UKMi and feature in the NICE Medicines Awareness Service. Further details on this service can be found at:

http://www.evidence.nhs.uk/about-evidence-services/content-and-sources/medicines-information/new-medicines-awareness-services

 

Published in News

Continuous Anticoagulation and Cold Snare Polypectomy Versus Heparin Bridging and Hot Snare Polypectomy in Patients on Anticoagulants With Subcentimeter Polyps: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Annals of Internal Medicine

This RCT (n=184) suggests small colorectal polyps may be resected safely with cold-snare polypectomy while oral anticoagulation continues, compared to heparin bridging with hot-snare polypectomy, and was associated with a lower incidence of major bleeding.

 

Benefits and Harms of Oral Anticoagulant Therapy in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Annals of Internal Medicine

Review of 45 RCTs (n=34,082) concludes in early-stage CKD, non–vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) had benefit–risk profile superior to that of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). For advanced CKD or ESKD, there was insufficient evidence to establish benefits or harms of VKAs v NOACs.

 

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto▼): reminder that 15 mg and 20 mg tablets should be taken with food

Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency

MHRA has received a small number of reports suggesting lack of efficacy (thromboembolic events) in patients taking 15 mg or 20 mg rivaroxaban on an empty stomach. Healthcare professional are advised to remind patients to take 15 mg or 20 mg rivaroxaban tablets with food.

 

Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs) in Renal Impairment: Practice Guide to Dosing Issues

Specialist Pharmacy Service

This paper explains the background to dosing decisions for DOACs in patients with impaired renal function and focusses on the use of DOACs in patients with AF. It provides case study examples from current clinical practice and is intended as a practice aid.

 

 

The above records have been identified by UKMi and feature in the NICE Medicines Awareness Service. Further details on this service can be found at:

http://www.evidence.nhs.uk/about-evidence-services/content-and-sources/medicines-information/new-medicines-awareness-services

Published in News

Optimal route for administering tranexamic acid in primary unilateral total hip arthroplasty: Results from a multicenter cohort study

British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

Data collection from 7,667 total hip arthroplasties found that IV, topical, and combined tranexamic acid all showed a significantly lower incidence of DVT than controls (0.08% vs 0.47%, p=0.001) as well as a lower rate of other complications (0.34% vs 0.67%, p=0.044).

 

Atrial fibrillation groups lobby patients to overturn screening committee decision

British Medical Journal

Article reports that patients' groups with funding from drug companies with vested interests are putting pressure on the National Screening Committee to overturn its decision not to recommend an AF screening programme. Doctors are concerned the campaign goes against the evidence.

 

Revised SPC: Eliquis (apixaban) film-coated tablets

electronic Medicines compendium

The SPC has been updated to include information about dosing in patients undergoing interventions (e.g. catheter ablation) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

 

The above records have been identified by UKMi and feature in the NICE Medicines Awareness Service. Further details on this service can be found at:

http://www.evidence.nhs.uk/about-evidence-services/content-and-sources/medicines-information/new-medicines-awareness-services

 

Published in News

Association Between Warfarin Control Metrics and Atrial Fibrillation Outcomes in the Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

JAMA Cardiology

In this cohort study of 10,137 patients with atrial fibrillation, historical INR variance was associated with future bleeding events, but not with future stroke risk, suggesting caution when using historical INR to assess likelihood of bleeding or thrombotic events.

 

Antithrombotic doses: clinical observations from published clinical trials

British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

This review discusses uncertainties around optimal doses of antithrombotic agents e.g. data from RCTs show aspirin is effective at doses below 75 mg daily and direct oral anticoagulants reduce risk of stroke in AF patients at doses 1/4 of those currently recommended.

 

Duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent: systematic review and network meta-analysis

British Medical Journal

Review found long vs short term (>12 vs <6 months) DAPT resulted in higher rates of major bleeding (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.49) and non-cardiac death (1.63, 1.03 to 2.59); standard term (12 months) DAPT was associated with higher rates of any bleeding (1.39, 1.01 to 1.92).

 

A Practical Approach to Low-Dose Aspirin for Primary Prevention

Journal of the American Medical Association

This article discusses use of aspirin for primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in the context of 3 large trials demonstrating bleeding risks comparable with benefits, and proposes a practical approach to initiate, continue, or discontinue aspirin.

 

 

The above records have been identified by UKMi and feature in the NICE Medicines Awareness Service. Further details on this service can be found at:

http://www.evidence.nhs.uk/about-evidence-services/content-and-sources/medicines-information/new-medicines-awareness-services

Published in News